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POLITICS NEWS

POLITICS NEWS

  • The IMF on Tuesday trimmed its growth outlook for sub-Saharan Africa to 5.4 percent in 2013 and 5.7 percent in 2014 but said economic activity was being supported by rising investment and booming extractive industries.

     

  • Kenya's top telecoms firm Safaricom expects to maintain its almost 40 percent earnings margin this year but "premature taxes" could stifle growth of lucrative mobile phone-based money transfers, its chief executive said on Tuesday.

     

  • Institutional investors in Germany have appeared unfazed by the eurozone debt crisis.

     

  • Bulgaria's ethnic Turkish party MRF will not take part in a coalition with the nationalist Attack, its leader said on Tuesday, scuppering chances of a broad Socialist-led alliance that could command a majority in parliament.

     

  • Bulgaria's ethnic Turkish party MRF will not take part in a coalition with the nationalist Attack, its leader said on Tuesday, scuppering chances of a broad Socialist-led alliance that could command a majority in parliament.

     

  • The IMF on Tuesday trimmed its growth outlook for sub-Saharan Africa to 5.4 percent in 2013 and 5.7 percent in 2014 but said economic activity was being supported by rising investment and booming extractive industries.

     

  • Australia's struggling Labor government on Tuesday used the last budget before national elections to delay a long-promised return to surplus, blaming a stubbornly high Australian dollar and lower commodity prices for a dramatic fall in revenues.

     

  • Germany's second-biggest bank, Commerzbank, has launched a capital increase aimed at shedding the shackles of a state bailout.

     

  • Workers at two German Amazon locations have walked out in support of higher wages and to press their right to collective bargaining.

     

  • Reuters will issue this diary daily at around 1000 GMT.

     

  • Philippine President Benigno Aquino was set on Tuesday to win unprecedented control of the two chambers of Congress after mid-term elections, raising hopes for his reforms to sustain growth, create jobs and make a dent on chronic poverty.

     

  • Israel's cabinet on Tuesday approved the 2013-2014 budget draft that will slash spending and hike taxes this year and next to rein in a growing budget deficit.

     

  • A deputy head of China's top planning agency has been sacked for corruption after allegations against him were first posted online, media said on Tuesday, in the government's latest move against pervasive graft.

     

  • A boat carrying about 100 Rohingya Muslims capsized off western Myanmar with many feared drowned at the start of a mass evacuation from low-lying regions ahead of an approaching storm, a U.N. official said on Tuesday.

     

  • Greek state workers walked off the job on Tuesday to protest a government decision to ban a strike by high-school teachers, shutting down schools and reducing staff at hospitals to a minimum.

     

  • Major U.S. retailers including Gap Inc declined to endorse an accord on Bangladesh building and fire safety backed by Europe's two biggest fashion chains, a trans-Atlantic divide that may dilute garment industry reform efforts.

     

  • Higher-level U.S. Internal Revenue Service officials took part in discussions as far back as August 2011 about targeting by lower-level tax agents of "Tea Party" and other conservative groups, according to documents reviewed by Reuters on Monday.

     

  • Canada's Liberals regained a seat in the House of Commons on Monday in a race viewed as an early test of the popularity of the party's new leader, Justin Trudeau, son of former Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau.

     

  • A rift emerged between U.S. business groups and organized labor over a high-skilled worker program in the Senate immigration bill, as the tech industry and other firms on Monday pushed to make it easier for companies to hire people from abroad.

     

  • Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro on Monday sent some 3,000 troops into the streets of the capital of Caracas to crack down on rampant crime that has made the OPEC nation one of the most dangerous in the world.

     

  • Higher-level U.S. Internal Revenue Service officials took part in discussions as far back as August 2011 about targeting by lower-level tax agents of "Tea Party" and other conservative groups, according to documents reviewed by Reuters on Monday.

     

  • The Associated Press said on Monday the U.S. government secretly seized telephone records of AP offices and reporters for a two-month period in 2012, describing the acts as a "massive and unprecedented intrusion" into news-gathering operations.

     

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